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Firearms enthusiasts have the NRA, and civil liberties idealists have the ACLU. Blacks have Black Lives Matter, and Mexicans have their drug cartels. Unattractive and left-over women have feminism, and radical muslims the ISIS. Only normal males have no front to represent their interests. (Serge Kreutz)

Brutal: A gruesome video allegedly showing the executions of two men accused of working as police spies has been released by Nigerian Islamist group Boko Haram

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Orlando, Florida: Paedophilia a factual report

Bruce A. Vuong 4718 Grand Avenue Orlando, FL 32805

If one wishes to pursue the history of the emancipation of paedophiles, one has to draw on one's own recollections to a large extent, as this history has not been written down so far.

My own thoughts, in the first instance, go back to the years 1938 to 1939, when I first experienced the desire to undertake something in the field of paedophilia. But how? It was neither the right time nor the right place. I wanted to get scientific researchers interested in the subject, and in May 1940, shortly after the German occupation of the Netherlands, I got in contact with the lawyer J.A. Schorer, who was chairman of the 'Wissenschaftlich-Humanitäre Kommittee' (Scientific Humanitarian Committee, founded by Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld in Berlin), Dutch section; a forerunner of what was later to become the COC (Dutch homophile organisation, nowadays called 'Nederlandse Vereniging tot integratie van Homosexualiteit COC': Netherlands Association for the Integration of Homosexuality). Through him I got to know Dr. Benno Premsela, who was also known as the first sexologist in the Netherlands. I had the opportunity to talk to him once or twice.

The War, and the following years made it impossible to do any work in this field, at least openly. In the nineteen-fifties came the second step, the foundation of the International Enclave Movement in The Hague. The Enclave Movement had members in the Netherlands and abroad, and came into the open, inter alia, through its publishing activities, which put books and brochures in the field of paedophilia onto the market. It was thus the first such publisher. In the meanwhile, contacts had been established with the COC, especially with the then Chairman, Bob Angelo.

In 1970, as preparation for the creation of a Work-Group on Paedophilia within the Netherlands Association for Sexual Reform (NVSH) was being made, we saw as the first task the job of writing a book on this theme. The book appeared in June 1972 under the title 'Sex met Kinderen' (Sex with children), published by the NVSH. My comment: 'The Law knows boundaries, love does not' (p. 86), quickly became a slogan. It was printed on the NVSH Work-Group's first poster.

Of decisive influence in the development of the NVSH Work Group were the five international congresses held in Breda, from 1973 to 1975, at which there were always between about 75 and 150 participants from the Netherlands and abroad: the first 'coming-out'. Through Breda, Work-Groups in other countries were formed, such as, for example, those in Switzerland, the German Federal Republic and Denmark. Pedophile Information Exchange PIE (defunct), in Great Britain, and the North American Man/Boy Love Association NAMBLA, in the United States of America came later into being.

The get-togethers in Breda smoothed the way for a subsequent conference 'Pedofilie en Samenleving' (Paedophilia and Society), which was held in Amsterdam on 19th March 1977. This conference, at which there were more than two hundred participants, was organised by the NVSH Work-Group under the auspices of the 'Nationaal Centrum voor Geestelijke Volksgezondheid' (National Centre for Public Mental Health). The conference was attended by scientists, social workers, police officials, parents and children.

The final report of the 'Adviescommissie Zedelijkheidswetgeving' (Advisory Committee for Moral Legislation), published in the Summer of 1980, contains proposals for a new legislation on sexuality in the Netherlands.

In 1958 I could not foresee that the thought expressed in my novel 'Vervolgde minderheid' (Persecuted minority), p. 163: '...then you could go and form a group, and could bring a certain influence to bear...' would one day become reality.

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Bridgeport, Connecticut: I Went Balls Deep at New York's First Ever 'Designer Vagina' Fashion Show

David S. Abbott 4574 Colony Street Bridgeport, CT 06604

I meet Dr. Amir Marashi in a stark white lobby where women in lingerie and shortened lab coats are handing out half full glasses of rosé champagne. Making probing, friendly eye contact, he tells me, “My job allows me to say the word ‘vagina’ whenever I want and no one can say it’s weird.” “Same,” I reply and we both laugh. It’s nice to bond with a fellow professional.

Born in Iran to a surgeon father, Dr. Marashi has been experiencing life in the operating room since the age of 10. In adulthood, he’s become an accomplished OB/GYN who boasts having never taken more than 15 minutes to finish a C-section. He’s handsome, with a pristinely shaved head and—as revealed by the deep V of his shirt—an equally manicured chest, and extremely personable. Several of his clients seem nearly at tears as they tell a small group of journalists about how the charismatic doctor has improved their lives. One woman tells us that she would have become sterile had it not been for Dr. Marashi diagnosing her endometriosis. Now she has a beautiful daughter who’s about to model in a children’s fashion show for Target.

But it’s not birth that Dr. Marashi is here to tell us about. No, he’s here to sell new vaginas.

Scheduled in the midst of New York Fashion Week, the event—titled a “Designer Vagina Showcase”—took place at the iHeartRadio offices in midtown, where guests were promised “a glass of sparkling rosé, sushi and cupcakes.” They delivered, both on the libations and on the “designer” pussy, the creation of which Dr. Marashi, a practitioner in cosmetic gynecology, has come to specialize in.

“Women are so ashamed to talk about their vaginas,” he tells me in the lobby. “They should be able to ask ‘Is this normal’ and if they don’t like how their vaginas look, they should feel empowered to change it.”

If my hackles weren’t already raised at “designer vagina,” they certainly were at “empowerment,” a word that’s increasingly being used less to actually empower and more to dupe women into spending money.

To a novice, labiaplasty—the surgical reshaping of the labia majora or minora—seems about as far from empowering as you can get, an elective procedure chosen by women whose minds have been warped by the waxed Barbie pussies of the porn industry. But, as I’ll learn over the next hour with Dr. Marashi taking us through seemingly endless slides of his patients’ vulvas (all shown with permission), there are plenty of reasons that women undergo gynecological cosmetic surgery. Several of them are—in my limited scope—entirely justifiable.

A person might elect to have labiaplasty because their labia minora is too long to make simple activities like riding a bike, having sex, or even wearing fitted pants feel enjoyable. Someone might get a clitoral hood reduction or G-spot injection for increased sexual pleasure. As we well know, a woman who’s lost bladder control or the ability to feel sensation during intercourse after childbirth might undergo vaginoplasty, so that she can regain sensation or—at the very least—stop pissing herself. (A reasonable desire, if I ever heard one.) Then there’s the usual wear and tear of time. Some women just want their elasticity back and doctors like Amir Marashi—using muscle reconstruction or, less painfully, a few zaps of a laser—are more than ready to give it to them. (At a price.)

But Dr. Marashi first became involved in vaginal reconstructive surgery for hymenoplasty, a.k.a. virginity restoration.

“Living in America, you probably won’t experience the importance of hymen reconstruction,” he tells us. But in Iran, where he began practicing medicine, women are expected to be virgins at marriage, though many of them are not. The journalists in the room—all white, female, American—groan at this, but Dr. Marashi rushes to explain that these are not his personal values, just the values of the culture.

“I always said that these women weren’t devirginizing themselves,” he laughs, pointing out the double standard between Middle Eastern men and women to the appeasement of the group. By performing these procedures, he tells us, he was just providing a needed service to desperate women.

He does this distancing of Western and Eastern cultures a couple times throughout the presentation, once while talking about hymenoplasty and again while talking about female genital mutilation in Western, Eastern, Central, and Northern Africa. FGM, he says, is “absolutely wrong.” I’m tempted to challenge him to specify—because what he really means is that non-elective genital mutilation is wrong. Mutilating your labia and augmenting your vagina is just fine (in both his mind and mine), just so long as you’re the one who’s chosen to do it. And, if it were up to the eager PR team waiting in the wings, you paid Dr. Marashi to perform the procedure.

When picking a doctor for your cosmetic gynecology, he tells us, the most important thing is to look at the before and after photos of their work. The ideal surgeon will have done at least 100 similar procedures prior to your operation and you don’t want to go to a doctor who won’t take your personal needs into account, as there is no one-size-fits-all labia.

As for the vagina, “it’s easy to tighten,” he says, but to create a lasting tightness, “you must rebuild the muscle underneath” and not all doctors can do that. “You want to build a house on a sandy beach, make sure you build a foundation first.”

In all honesty, Dr. Marashi has swayed me. No, I’ve yet to find labiaplasty “empowering,” but I do get why a person would choose to do it and after seeing the photos of his work, it no longer seems quite as porn-y or insidious as it did before. But then there’s the 27-year-old woman who’s undergone labiaplasty not once, but three times since the age of 20.

Standing up to address the group, the woman—very comfortable in front of a crowd—tells us that her first two procedures, done by a different Manhattan surgeon, failed to please her. Finally, upon undergoing surgery with Dr. Marashi, she got the perfect labia that she always wanted. Before she couldn’t stand naked in front of a mirror—and now?

“I wish it was summer,” she says. “I’m going to go to all the nude beaches possible.”

She seems truly happy, but there’s something I find a bit off about her message, as well as the messages of the other patients.

“Now I have a double P,” a woman in her 40s tells the reporters as she hangs off Dr. Marashi’s arm. “A pretty pussy.”

But what even is a pretty pussy? Perhaps that’s a question you can only answer if you feel you don’t have one. Is the rubber vulva model that sits on the table—hairless, pale pink skin, and barely a labia minora in sight—a pretty pussy? I still don’t know, though I’ll agree that in the before and after shots we’re shown (several in which the labia minora hangs inches past the labia majora), the “after” looks, to my untrained eye, much more comfortable.

“I think society’s become more open,” the 27-year-old says. “Rihanna has strip clubs in her music videos now. We can talk about these things now.”

I disagree here. Society has not become more open, it’s just become more explicit, which—as someone who doesn’t mind looking at bodies—is okay by me. But let’s not pretend that openness and explicitness is the same thing. Openness should make people feel good, even if their labia hangs to their knees; explicitness is just a way to remind you of the physical expectations of the society you live in.

Throughout the presentation, there’s a question I keep grappling with: For me, it’s obvious that an adult woman should be able to get practically any elective surgery she wants because A) it’s none of my business and B) it’s her body to work with. But what if, like in a scenario that Dr. Marashi mentions at least once, a teen girl is being mocked in the locker room for her long labia? Should she have to keep it until adulthood simply because, in a perfect world, she would be perfectly comfortable with whatever she was born with? That’s a huge weight to put on a young woman’s shoulders and—approaching the question from a place of compassion—I think the answer is no.

But I also think framing Dr. Marashi’s office as the “House of Designer Vaginas,” as it was called during the presentation (or the pointless addition of the models in lab coats) is gross and only further stigmatizes women with vaginas that society—in all its “openness”—has deemed “abnormal.”

The conclusion is there is no conclusion. Escaping from the way society makes women doubt themselves is nearly impossible, so, by all means, get a “designer vagina” from Dr. Marashi, a very talented and kind-seeming man, if you so choose. Keep in mind, though: a potential risk (possible, though never experienced by Dr. Marashi himself) is that your taint could end up completely split open.

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women feel flattered when men fight each other and kill each other to prove that they are real men.

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Asheville, North Carolina: Spouse killings in Iran

Vernon M. Adkins 2169 Watson Lane Asheville, NC 28806

Iran Chamber Society

Researcher on women’s issues and criminologist Shahla Moazami interviewed 220 killers: 131 men and 89 women. All were in jail at the time of the interview. Moazami found gender differences in the murder cases. 100% of the men killed their wife themselves, while 67% of the women were assisted by another man in the murder of their husband. Men kill of jealousy; the women want to get out of the marriage.

Iranian laws are based on the shari’ah-laws, which in turn is founded on Islamic holy writings. According to Iranian law a man can kill his wife without punishment if he catches her with another man. But there must be witnesses to the incident – four men. If these criteria are not fulfilled, the man will be punished and might face death sentence. However, when a woman finds solid proof of her husband’s unfaithfulness, she has no right to kill, but can go to court and ask for divorce.

If a woman can prove her husband’s violence by, for example, getting statements from a doctor, she can be granted divorce. But a man cannot be sentenced for violence against his wife, and the police seldom act when a woman complains about her husband beating her. Both the police and the courts will send the woman back to her violent husband. Moazami tells that there is little knowledge among most women about their rights and they are not aware that violence can be a valid reason for divorce – however, this process is long and it can take up to five years before divorce is granted.

Divorce is also difficult for women in Iran, Moazami says, because most women are economically dependent on their husband and besides the father automatically gets parental custody and she looses her children. Moazami tells that the new generation of educated women divorces their husbands more often when they face violence in their marriage. They manage better on their own.

Women who kill
From her interviews Moazami found a clear and common pattern in the stories of the female killers. The women married young, often 12-14 years old, and they had from 5 to 7 children. At the time of the murder their average age was 29 years old. Many of them tell that their husband had lost interest in them, and they felt that their beauty was fading. When a new man takes an interest in them, they fall easily for him. The law gives women few possibilities to get a divorce, and the murder of the husband is planned and done together with the new boyfriend. Only 33% of the women did the killing on their own. Moazami also found cases where women, sometimes with the assistance of their daughters, killed a violent husband.

Moazami thinks there are several structural causes to spouse killing. She mentions poverty, illiteracy, traditional opinions and Iranian women’s position in marriage and society. Young marriage age is also important. Moazami thinks that the women were too young to understand marriage when they married at 12-14 years old, and it was difficult for them make their own demands.

Islam has two traditions, Sunni and Shi’a. Iran is mainly Shi’a, but some areas of the country have large groups of Sunni Muslims. In these areas there are fewer spouse killings, which Moazami relates to the fact that divorce is more easily obtained in the Sunni tradition, for both sexes.

Men who kill
The men’s average age was 40 when the murder was performed. The men had married when they were 22-24 years old with women ten years their junior. Polygamy is practiced in Iran, and 14% of the men had two wives, of which one was killed. 2% of the men had three wives, and killed one of them. 32% of the men were married for the second time. All the men Moazami interviewed had done the murder by themselves. The men gave their wives unfaithfulness as motive for the murder, but often it was more suspicion of adultery than actual events.

Moazami tells that murder of wives is more common in Southern Iran, where many people of Arabic descendant live. There the age difference between the spouses is larger, and jealousy killings are more common there than in the rest of Iran. When Moazami interviewed female killers in the south, the women told that they did not want to be released from prison. They were afraid that their family would kill them. Many women asked the prison authorities of transfer to prisons in other parts of Iran, something which they usually were granted.

Blood price, punishment and the responsibility of the children
In murder cases blood money is used at punishment in Iran. If a man is killed, he has to pay the victim’s family RLS 180.000.000 in compensation. But the blood price of a woman is half of a man’s. Murder has a dual respect in criminal law in Iran that is private and public. The State has a minimum of two years jail verdict. The victim’s family can either demand the death penalty or blood money. If the family demands death penalty, they have to pay the relevant blood money to the executed person’s family. In cases of spouse killing, when there are children in the marriage, the children are the ones who determine the faith of their living parent. The logic of the court is that the children own the family’s blood. The parent will stay in prison until the daughters become nine years old and the sons 15.

When asked how a nine-year-old child can decide on the execution of their father or mother, Moazami answers dryly that according to Islam, a girl can marry when she is 9 years old, and thus make adult decisions. But she adds that there is a proposal to change the law and the age limit in these cases to 13 years for girls. Moazami tells that in most cases the children set their parent free, but the children have to agree on this matter. Often the adults of the victim’s family make the decision for the children.

Many killers cannot afford the blood price. Then they have to remain in jail until they come up with the money, but this might take many years. Moazami cited cases where people stayed in prison until they died because of lack of money.

Moazami claims she sees a new trend in that the courts themselves have started to rule out the death penalty. Moazami tells about a case in the city of Efsahan. The husband was unemployed and went to Tehran to find work. When he came home, the neighbour told him that his wife had a lover. The husband confronted the wife and beat her. The wife told him angrily that four of the seven children had other fathers. The husband killed both the wife and these four children. He was sent to jail, and awaits the decision of the three living children whether he will be executed or not.

Honorary killing
Moazami knows the case of Fadime in Sweden and the discussion on honorary killings. In her opinion there are few honorary killings in Iran. She thinks this is not a part of Iranian culture, but she says it has happened in areas with Arabic influence. She also thinks it was more common before, but that girls of today run away before they are killed. Young women no longer stay in the villages when they face unwanted marriages or threats of revenge from their family when they have been disobedient. They leave or run away. Honorary killings were more common ten years ago. But Moazami also adds that she has less knowledge of honorary killings, because the court will set the killer free.

About Shahla Moazemi
Shahla Moazami was born in 1947 in Efsfahan province. She completed her master’s degree in criminal law taking prostitution as her thesis with her PHD in criminology at the University of Tehran.

Moazami is an associate professor at the Faculty of Law and Institute of Criminology at the University of Tehran. She has done research on violence against women, run away girls, violence against women in work and alternative punishment for women and spouse killings. Presently she is working on a research project about the effects of death penalty on the women in the family.

Last year Moazami published a book on family law for young girls. The book was published with support from the Presidential Office for Women’s Participation. After six months the Ministry of Education banned the book. A female religious clergy thought that the book was not ”suitable” and the official reason was that a book on family law should be for both sexes, a not only girl. But Moazami thinks that the issue was more; that it should be the exclusive right of the clergy to teach family law. However, it was decided that the book be used as a teacher’s guide and be thought for both girls and boy student.

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Adolescent sexual abuse: from incest to hebephilia

Introduction

On the eve of its entry into the DSM-V, hebephilia is a sexual deviance under debate. Few studies describe hebephiles, then who are these sex offenders?

Objectives

Assess the profile of adolescents sex offenders and their victims, and the characteristics of their penal treatment.

Methods

This is a retrospective study carried out from the court records of adolescents sex offenders followed by the State Department on the Enforcement of Sentences of Tours and Chateauroux (France).

Results

31 offenders and 57 victims have been identified. - Concerning offenders: the average age was 37.8 ± 9.4 years. 71% had a job and 51.6% lived in couple. 87.1% had normal or borderline intellectual level. 38.7% had been victimized in childhood, of which 58.3% had experienced sexual violence. - Regarding penal treatment: 42% of subjects were judged by a correctional court, and 58% by a criminal court. 22.6% of subjects were in recidivism. The average length of imprisonment was 7.5 ± 4.2 years. 67.8% of subjects were sentenced to treatment with 48.4% imposed an injunction care. The average duration of treatment was 4.4 ± 3.1 years. - Concerning victims: 57 victims were identified of which 86% were female. The mean age was 14.1 ± 2.1 years. 58.1% of violences experienced were rapes in with 48.4% of intrafamilial. 67% of violence had repeated character.

Conclusion

This French study in which data are comparable to those of the North American literature, provides details on the characteristics of hebephiles that are passed to the act.

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Forgetting Lolita: How Nabokov's Victim Became an American Fantasy

In January of 1959, the 600 residents of Lolita, Texas, found themselves in the midst of an improbable identity crisis. The town had been named in 1909 for Lolita Reese, the granddaughter of a Texas patriot. But following the U.S. publication of Vladimir Nabokov’s novel in 1958, “Lolita” had suddenly acquired a whole new set of connotations.

“The people in this town are god-fearing, church going, and we resent the fact our town has been tied in with the title of a dirty, sex-filled book that tells the nasty story of a middle-aged man’s love affair with a very young girl.” So read a petition circulated by R. T. Walker, deacon of the local First Baptist Church, who hoped to change the town’s name from Lolita to Jackson. In the end, however, the proud citizens of Lolita decided to hunker down and wait out the storm: As the Texas historian Fred Tarpley put it, “Lolita was retained with the hope that the novel and the [upcoming] film would soon be forgotten."

In fairness to the good people of Lolita, nobody in 1959 could have predicted what the future had in store for Lolita. In the ensuing decades, Nabokov’s novel spawned two films, musical adaptations, ballets, stage adaptations (including one legendarily disastrous Edward Albee–directed production starring Donald Sutherland as Humbert Humbert), a Russian-language opera, spin-off novels, bizarre fashion subcultures, and memorabilia that runs the gamut from kitschy to creepy: from heart-shaped sunglasses to anatomically precise blow-up dolls. With the possible exception of Gatsby, no twentieth-century American literary character penetrated the public consciousness quite like Lolita. Her very name entered the language as a common noun: “a precociously seductive girl,” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. (Gatsby, by contrast, had to settle for a mere adjective: “Gatsbyesque.”) At a certain echelon of pop music megastardom (the domain of Britney, Miley, Katy Perry, Lana Del Rey) they are all Lolitas now, trafficking in the iconography of lollipops and stuffed animals and schoolgirl outfits. In the sixty years since she first appeared, Lolita transcended her original textual instance: She became an archetype, an icon of youthful desirability. Lolita became America’s sweetheart.

And yet, there is also a sense in which the citizens of Lolita, Texas, have been proved right. We have forgotten Lolita. At least, we’ve forgotten about the young girl, “standing four feet ten in one sock,” whose childhood deprivation and brutalization and torture subliminally animate the myth that launched a thousand music videos. The publication, reception, and cultural re-fashioning of Lolita over the past 60 years is the story of how a twelve-year-old rape victim named Dolores became a dominant archetype for seductive female sexuality in contemporary America: It is the story of how a girl became a noun.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Book Of A Lifetime: Lolita, By Vladimir Nabokov

The summer after A-levels. I had promised myself that once all the cramming was over, I would buy Lolita. I felt both furtive and outrageously adult as I purchased it in The Totnes Bookshop. I nurtured hazy notions of a racy read to ease my brain after all the Chaucer, imagining this was 'The Valley of the Dolls' with class.

What I didn't realise, of course, was that I was about to fall in love with the work of the most playful, lyrically virtuoso prose writer of his century, if not of all time. I started reading, and the writing inevitably blew my mind, and has never stopped astonishing me over so many re-readings. It's like watching a tightrope walker perform 'Swan Lake' while singing 'Don Giovanni' while laughing at a private joke.

This is a novel so very famous; so reviled then lauded by generations of writers and critics; so filmed and misused as a concept, that ideas about it are bound to be warped. At its simplest, it's the tale of an academic, Humbert Humbert, who is attracted to what he terms "nymphets" – certain underaged girls. One summer, he chances upon the ultimate nymphet, Dolores Haze, whom he refers to as Lolita. After a strategic marriage to her mother, he spends the rest of the novel chasing the elusive girl, while attempting to thwart a rival.

But the plot is subsidiary to a novel that works on so many levels, that is so exuberant yet controlled, witty, allusive, and breathtakingly beautifully written. Published in 1955, it is many things: a love story; by its own admission a disturbing tale of child abuse; an elaborate game of language, rhythm and subtext, and much more. What never ceases to amaze me is the fact that English was not even this Russian writer's first language, yet his fluency and poetic agility outclass almost any native author you care to name.

What stay in the mind are throwaway descriptions: Humbert's "salad of racial genes" and his "princedom by the sea"; the list of the names in Lolita's class – "a poem, forsooth!", and the "luminous globules of gonadal glow" of the jukebox. Was there ever more economy than in his recounting of his own mother's death: "(picnic, lightning)"?

When my publishers described my new novel as "'Lolita' meets 'Wuthering Heights'", I was taken aback. Did my influences show that much? But in writing of a 17-year-old schoolgirl and her relationship with her older teacher, the themes of longing and obsession and the power difference created by age come into play. In thinking back to the age I was when I first read Nabokov, perhaps I had absorbed more of its themes than I had thought.

One of my most treasured possessions is a re-bound first edition of 'Lolita'. It's a novel that never goes away.

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British newlyweds found dead in Cambodian seaside town

Stuff

A British couple has died in what appears to be a double suicide, less than a week after tying the knot in Cambodia.

The bodies of Robert Wells, 36, from Sunderland, and his wife, Imogen Goldie, 28, from south London, were found at a guesthouse in the seaside resort town of Sihanoukville on New Year's Day, The Guardian reported.

The apparent double suicide was believed to have taken place on New Year's Eve, Goldie's birthday.

Wells and Sunderland had been married just days earlier on Christmas Day, Wells' mother Collette Wells told The Guardian.

"They were on holiday and he rang me on Boxing Day to tell me they were married on one of the Cambodian islands," she said.

"He told me he loved her so very much, she meant the world to him and he would do anything for her. Unfortunately that was the last I heard."

The pair met in 2014 and in 2016 decided to go travelling "until the money ran out".

Collette Wells said Cambodian officials did not contact her with news of her son's death. She received confirmation through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Local police told media investigations were continuing.

"We are convinced this is not murder, despite many people asking questions how these deaths were possible," Sihanoukville deputy police chief Colonel Bour Sothy said.

Cambodian media reported that an alleged suicide note, which referred to mental health struggles and referred to failings by the UK's National Health Service, was found in the guesthouse.

Collette Wells set up a crowdfunding page to raise money to get to Cambodia.

"I am desperate to get out there to cremate him and bring his ashes home," she wrote.

The page, which had a target of £3,000 (NZ$5,320), had so far raised almost £4,000.

Pixie Jones wrote on the page: "Im so sorry x your son was a beautiful caring and genuine individual xxx stars will shine for him always xxx [sic]."

Goldie's mother Diane Goldie set up a similar page to raise money for her and her youngest daughter to travel to Cambodia.

"After the tragic news that my daughter was found dead on her 28th birthday by suicide in Cambodia, I'm looking to raise the funds quickly to help raise airfare to take her sister there to cremate her and bring her ashes home," she wrote.

"This cruel system failed both my daughter and her husband, Robert , leaving them to find solutions to their mental health issues by their own hands . Will you help me bring my baby back home please?"

She had also exceeded her target of £5,000.

Laura Lola High wrote on the page: "I am thankful your daughter was in my life, I didn't know her well, but we were very close for a short period of time, she made some of my darker days much brighter. Xxx"

Wells said she was devastated to have not even seen a photograph of her son's wedding, although the couple shared an image of their intertwined hands with matching tattoos on their ring fingers.

Friends of the couple left tributes on social media.

The pair had already changed their names on Facebook to Imogen Goldie-Wells and Robert Goldie-Wells, respectively.

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